Archives for classic cars

A little treat for fans of the 1957 Chevy Belair

Last month Chris and Lindsie entered Boise’s July 4th Idaho Statesman Chalk Art Festival at Ann Morrison Park. Their topic of choice? A classic car, of course!

1957 Chevy Bel Air

The 1957 Chevy Bel Air in chalk completed!

The closeup of the ’57 Chevy Bel Air was a bit tricky (as was the muscle car in the reflection on the door side panel) but after a day’s worth of smudging and smearing and color combining, this was the result!

Of all of the people who passed their square, about 20 of them were able to guess the correct year, make and model. Many had a story to share about their own Bel Air they used to drive.

It was a lot of fun and a great way to spread the love of classic cars and meet other car fans!

You can see more photos from the festival here.

Veterans Fund Run Car Show at Idaho State Veterans Home

We have a good friend Bob who works across Main Street at NAPA Auto Parts where The Shop is a frequent visitor. We told us about an upcoming car show we hadn’t been to yet called the Veterans Fund Run on May 18. Although we didn’t have the Buick quite ready to enter, we stopped by the Idaho State Veterans Home to say hi to Bob (who was helping with his car club that ran the show) and take a look at the classics that showed up.

They had a great showing this year, with almost 200 cars in a variety of years and makes. And it was great to see the veterans at the peruse the cars to choose their favorites. The Best of Show award is chosen by the veterans.

Here are a few of the photos we took at the show. Excuse the many shots of the Buicks in attendance — we are a bit partial.

1946 Plymouth Special Deluxe has arrived!

Chris and John always have their eyes peeled for classic cars — a flash of chrome here, the curve of a fender there, peeking out from a deserted garage, stranded in a farmer’s field or hidden in Boise’s suburbia. Once such recent find was a 1946 Plymouth Special Deluxe. And what a find it was!

A true piece of history, this vehicle might well be a mob car from the ’40s with stories to tell. It has bonafied bullet holes on the driver-side door, a black shiny patina, and (once upon a time) plush interior seating. I can just imagine a bunch of mob bosses ruling the neighborhood from within the cushy confines of this luxury vehicle.

Or course, it not a luxury vehicle today. It’s showing its age, but mostly on the inside, where years of being in the sun is obvious in the condition of the upholstery.  But that is all fixable. The exterior does have some surface rust, but a lot of black paint is in good condition. If you like the look of an aged patina, like many resto-rods rat rods are exhibiting these days, this is a perfect start. The body is pretty straight, with only a few dents and scratches, and most of the chrome is still in tact. The details are pretty amazing — the hood ornament and trunk light ornament are nice art-deco touches of a renaissance ship, mast and all.

When Plymouth started making cars again after the war, this was its first model and the Special Deluxe was the top-of-the-line option. And, amazingly enough, the car even features a push-start ignition, something not widely embraced in cars for another decade. Today it’s considered a high-tech feature, but it’s been around for almost 70 years.

This car is prime for a restoration project. The engine and tranny are gone, making in a blank canvas for the setup you want.

See more photos at our listing at ClassicCars.com and call Chris at (208) 908-1366 if you want to take a look in person.

The Fairlane has a new home

We spent about an hour getting the Fairlane running again. We had plans to start in on a few parts of her when two guys from Sweden spotted her and fell in love. They were in town visiting family and shopping for classics to take back home with them. (Apparently classic cars are a rare breed there. Who knew?) We decided to part with her early and let them enjoy the restoration. Here are some pics from the loading up of her and the other 3 cars they took home with them.